Tag Archives: The Dollhouse Reading Series

The Dollhouse Reading Series

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I am writing this post pretty much in real-time right now as The Dollhouse Reading Series #31 just took place; the writer in me just can’t avoid procrastination of deadlines… but, let me preface my thoughts by saying that I am new to the literary community, and I really enjoyed this reading, and would love to attend these sort of events more regularly. Good people, good vibes, cool though provoking poems… “That’s that shit I do like”, in the words of contemporary poet Chief Keef, sort of… The reading took place in some very nice people’s apartment, which is cool because they invited tons of people–it was pretty packed in a decently big Chicago apartment— purely because they love poetry. Unfortunately, Peter Davis, who wrote the book of poems I just read, Poetry!, Poetry!, Poetry!, couldn’t make the event due to an illness, but, they started the reading with one of his poems discussing his idea that saying “Happy Thanksgiving” has perverse and grotesque undertones.
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The second reader was Sarah Fox, who read a lot of feminist poems, with a comedic nature that empowered without sounding repetitive and extreme.
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The reader who followed was Tony Trigilio, who teaches at Columbia University in my hometown of Chicago. Tony read poems discussing his re-watching of the series Dark Shadows, which he first encountered with his mother at a young age, and it gave him nightmares.
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The last poet to read was Hoa Nguyen, who had a very eccentric and exciting sort of reading style. She read poems discussing her children, and raising them in a sort of frightening and decaying society, and also poems about her awesome mother, who apparently was a Vietnamese motorcycle stunt woman.
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It was interesting to hear all of these poets from a seemingly very different background, read poems that hit close to home to them. It lends a certain kind of understanding to the audience of the author’s true intentions of their poems.